21 Vocabulary Words That Only Teachers Understand

From “candygeddon” to “glitcident,” the words only make sense if you’re a teacher.

Teacher Vocabulary Words That Only Educators Understand

While the words on this list might seem made up to some, they definitely make sense to a teacher. Here are some of the teacher vocabulary words that you’ll only understand if you’re an educator.

1. EDUMUNITY (n)

The amazing, powerful immunity educators build from constantly being around sick kids.

2. GLITCIDENT (n)

When you have the best intentions of using glitter in the classroom, but then an accident occurs, making you deeply regret your choice.

3. OBSERVALOR (n)

The courage to try a brand-new activity on a day you’re being observed (observation + valor).

4. PARANT (n)

An unexpected and out-of-the-blue email-rant from an angry parent.

5. LINETATOR (n)

The generally sweet child who turns into a dictator the moment you make them line leader.

6. DESKASTER (n)

The disaster of papers to grade, papers to be returned, notes, writing utensils, and other items that cover your desk on any given day.

7. UNSUBCESSFUL (adj)

When you return to your class the day after being out sick only to learn that your sub didn’t do anything that was on your sub plans. This can also be used when you try to find a sub but can’t.

8. ABSENTEERFUL (n)

The cheerful feeling of relief a teacher gets when “that” student is absent.

9. DÉJÀ STU (n)

The feeling  you get when a new student looks or behaves exactly like a student you’ve had before.

10. CANDYGGEDON (n)

The sugar high that occurs at Halloween, Valentine’s Day, or any other special day where students are operating on large amount of candy.

 

11. PLAYDOUROMA  (n)

The unmistakeable odor of Play-dough that sticks to your hands after touching it. 

12. GUESSIN’ PLANNIN’ (v)

When you’re not totally sure what you’re going to teach that day, but you figure you can wing it

13. CHORE CURRICULUM (n)

When you have more interesting things you want to teach, but you’re forced to make a lesson plan that hits Common Core Standards

14. EXCUCITIS (n)

The sick, annoyed feeling you experience when a student arrives in your classroom without their materials for the umpteenth time. (Excuse + “itis”)

15. CONFUSATE (v)

To respond/engage with a student (or anyone else) when they’re telling a story that makes absolutely no sense You’re confused, but you’re going to go with it.

16. CELLSESSION (n)

The obsessive need some middle and high school students have to check their cell phones throughout your class even after you’ve warned them to stop. It’s having a cell and an obsession at the same time.

17. DISTACTION (n)

When a student distracts your entire class by saying something rude or tactless.

18. XEROXITED (adj)

The jubilant feeling you get when you need to make copies immediately and not only is there no line, but the copier works perfectly without jamming. Who knew you could get so excited by a Xerox machine?

19. PROGRESS RETORT (n)

What you’re thinking (but don’t say) when a parent talks about how awesome and perfect their child is.

 

 

20. STANDARDIZEHAUSTION (adj)

This is the bone-weary feeling one has after preparing for, administering, and examining the data collected from standardized tests. Frankly, you’re exhausted.

21. UNSITCESSFUL (n)

When you finally get a moment to sit down after running around to all your students and making sure they were doing what they were supposed to only to have your principal walk in the room.

What teacher vocabulary words would you add to the list? Come share in our WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook. 

 

Posted by meghanmathis

I'm a high school English teacher, curriculum designer, and freelance writer who loves thinking, talking, debating, arguing, and laughing about education.

One Comment

  1. 3, 6, 7, 8, 16, 17, 18. I literally had OBSERVALOR during my last observation — tried something I’d never done before.

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