3 STEAM Projects That Build a Better Tomorrow

How your students can use science, technology, arts, engineering and math (STEAM) concepts to help their communities.

STEAM Projects That Build a Better Tomorrow

We know our students can change the world. But amidst the required curriculum, testing and intense college preparation, it can be downright difficult to find ways for middle and high school students to make a real-world impact. That’s why we are excited about the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow contest. It invites public school students in grades 6-12 to use science, technology, arts, engineering and math (STEAM) concepts to come up with a solution for a problem they identify in their communities.

Past winners combined creative problem solving, critical thinking and STEAM to directly and dramatically improve the lives of people in their schools and communities. Check out these videos of the social good STEAM projects created by three of last year’s Samsung Solve for Tomorrow winners.

Specialized Classroom Furniture for Special Needs Students
by Ridgewood Middle School in Arnold, Missouri

Students at Ridgewood Middle School noticed that some of their special needs peers could benefit from special classroom furniture. And they also found out how expensive it is to buy. Using STEM concepts, they successfully produced more than 20 pieces of specialized (and affordable) furniture for their classmates.

 

Solar Powered Emergency Call Box on Community Hiking Trail
by Loudon Valley High School in Purcellville, Virginia

With limited cell reception on the Washington and Old Dominion Trail, several hikers and cyclists had been injured or attacked and were unable to call for help. Loudon Valley High School students used STEM to design a safety alert system for the trail that quickly connects people who need help to emergency services.

 

Prosthetic Enhancements for Veterans
by Horizon Community Middle School in Aurora, Colorado

Horizon Middle School is located near a military base, and many students have family and friends who are wounded veterans and struggle with the high cost of prosthesis. These students designed and produced enhancements to make lower-limb prosthetics more efficient, comfortable and affordable.

Jessica McFadden

Posted by Jessica McFadden

Jessica McFadden is a writer, blogger and parent living in the Washington, DC suburbs. A daughter of a teacher and a member of a family of teachers, she is happily at home interviewing teachers, principals and education specialists.