13 Classroom Math Hacks You’re Going to Want to Try

You can turn anything into a math lesson!

Some of the best math lessons are the most simple ones. Classroom clocks, Post-it notes, and even tape can all make quick and easy math lessons. Take a look at these classroom math hacks for tips on how to turn everyday items into learning moments for your students.

1. Turn your classroom door into a protractor. 

Thanks to Maria Howard from Beyond Long Division  for showing us how to make this protractor. It’s such a simple idea, but it really helps students see how to apply geometry to real life. 

2. Organize your math task cards. 

SOURCE: Will Teach for Tacos

If you have lots of task cards for different math lessons, then consider keeping them all organized with a photo organizer. Students can easily grab a set at their convenience. 

3. Blank dice make great lessons. 

Source: Think Grow Giggle

This teacher writes, “Dollar Tree says they are counting blocks. I say they are the world’s best open-ended dice.” She says she uses them for fractions, decimals, multiplication, comparing numbers, and more. Thanks for the great idea! 

4. Use stories to practice math lessons. 

SOURCE: Hello Mrs. Redfern

Mrs. Redfern impressed us with this idea for turning “The Three Little Pigs” into a math lesson . This is a STEM challenge that students will be excited to take on. 

5. Give them an entire wall to solve problems. 

SOURCE: Teaching in Rain

What happens when you give students a pack of Mr. Sketch markers and a giant wall of math problems? They get to work! We love this idea we found on Instagram. 

6. Use pool noodles to make fractions. 

This is one of our most popular WeAreTeachers videos. Get our tips for turning ordinary pool noodles into a useful fractions lesson for your students.

7. Play a little subtraction bowling. 

SOURCE: SW_and_Teach

Thanks to this teacher from Australia for the idea. Subtraction bowling is a great way for younger kids to really practice their addition and subtraction. 

8. Use your table to create an angles workstation. 

SOURCE: My Classbloom

This is another creative lesson using a tape. We love how this teacher took an ordinary table in her classroom to create a space where students can really do some hands-on learning. Let students use dry-erase markers to measure and write. Then wipe it off for them to try again and again. 

9. Try small tiles to tackle multiplication tables. 

Source: Hoffman Tutoring Group

We love this tip from Hoffman Tutoring Group. They recommend getting your hands on small tiles to help students learn about multiplication tables. You can even write on these tiles with dry-erase markers. 

10. Use Post-its for your math lesson. 

SOURCE: 8th Grade Math Teacher

Post-it notes are an easy hands-on tool for checking for comprehension. You can use them as a way to write out and solve problems. Another idea is to write the problem out on a whiteboard or chalkboard, the way you normally would, including the answer. But cover the answer, allowing students to try to solve it before revealing if they’re right. 

11. Make a shape station. 

SOURCE: Learn, Laugh, Love

Encourage your students to make different shapes using ordinary objects, like wooden craft sticks. You can have several students practice at once, or use it as a center activity. 

12. Make your clock work double time. 

SOURCE: She Teaches Primary

Clocks have so many great lessons built in. Add labels and notes to yours to help students better understand the language around reading a clock. 

13. Play math bingo. 

SOURCE: Making the Middle Matter

Math bingo is something that you can always bring out to give students a little break. You can make your own or find several options on Pinterest. 

What are you favorite math hacks ideas? Come share in our WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook.

Plus, check out our favorite websites for teaching math

Posted by Stacy Tornio

Stacy Tornio is a senior editor with WeAreTeachers. Nearly everyone in her family is a teacher. So she decided to be rebellious and write about teachers instead.

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