3 Halloween Art Projects That Incorporate Math

Spooky fun!

Looking for a craft to do for Halloween? Make it meaningful by integrating it with math!

haunted-window-array

1. Haunted Window Arrays
Have students create a window of arrays with spooky creatures lingering in the dim window lighting. Using a ruler, students come up with an array for their window scene. After they sketch out their window, students can come up with unique or traditional Halloween beings to lurk in their scene. Then they write their array and multiplication equation and product next to their art.

Multiplication-webs

2. Multiplication Webs
Students discover patterns in multiplication by creating spider webs. First, have students trace or construct a circle using a compass. Once their circle is created, they number it from 0 to 9 (see image). Next they decide on what multiplication table to do and draw lines connecting each product. For double digit numbers, students draw a line to the number in the tens place. Students could create their web with colored pencil or glue (your choice). After their web is completed, have the students add a spider to their web. Next to the web, instruct students to write down their answers to show their pattern.

costume-fractions

3. Costume Fractions
As a class, figure out the various fractions for Halloween costumes that students plan to wear on the big night. (For example, 3/20 of the class will be a witch.) Post the results on the board. Then have students compare their costume fraction (what they plan on dressing as) to another costume. Give them a sheet of white construction paper. Students draw their costume on the left hand side of the paper and write the class fraction for the costume next to their drawing. On the right hand side of the sheet they draw the other costume they chose to use for comparison and write the fraction for that costume next to their drawing. In the center of the sheet they draw a greater than, less than or equal to sign to compare the fractions of the two costumes.

Posted by Erin Bittman

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